RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH RBTH
Image'n'Nation: Minimalist color and forms by photographer Olga Rodina Moto Extreme on Kamchatka: between volcanoes, down the Pacific Coast

Mosfilm, the Russian Hollywood, marks its 90th anniversary

Mosflim, Europe's largest movie studio, was founded on January 24, 1924. This year will see its 90th anniversary. Mosfilm is an entire movie town in the southwest of today’s Moscow. It was built at the village Potylikha when the first Moscow film studio on Zhitnaya Street was no longer spacious enough to accommodate the ambitious undertakings of socialist directors.
Scroll down to see more

Press photo

Mosflim, Europe's largest movie studio, was founded on January 24, 1924. This year will see its 90th anniversary. Mosfilm is an entire movie town in the southwest of today’s Moscow. It was built at the village Potylikha when the first Moscow film studio on Zhitnaya Street was no longer spacious enough to accommodate the ambitious undertakings of socialist directors.
It is the studio where the best pictures of Sergei Eisenstein (photo: in the cutting room), Vsevolod Pudovkin, Alexander Dovzhenko, Sergei Bondarchuk, Mikhail Kalatozov, and Andrei Tarkovsky were shot... And the studio that houses the history of Russian and Soviet cinema.

Press photo

It is the studio where the best pictures of Sergei Eisenstein (photo: in the cutting room), Vsevolod Pudovkin, Alexander Dovzhenko, Sergei Bondarchuk, Mikhail Kalatozov, and Andrei Tarkovsky were shot... And the studio that houses the history of Russian and Soviet cinema.
Grigory Alexandrov’s “Jolly Fellows” (1934) was filmed there — the very first Soviet musical (photo: on set). The movie resulted from a trip by Eisenstein and company to Europe and the U.S. to study the techniques of sound cinema. “Jolly Fellows” was strongly influenced by the Hollywood school — the episode "musical fight" subsequently made its way into all movie-making textbooks.

Press photo

Grigory Alexandrov’s “Jolly Fellows” (1934) was filmed there — the very first Soviet musical (photo: on set). The movie resulted from a trip by Eisenstein and company to Europe and the U.S. to study the techniques of sound cinema. “Jolly Fellows” was strongly influenced by the Hollywood school — the episode "musical fight" subsequently made its way into all movie-making textbooks.
Wartime Soviet cinema, with its ability to raise the nation’s patriotic spirit, acquired strategic importance. When the Germans were approaching Moscow, all film studios were evacuated to Alma-Ata, where work continued “in the field.” The photo depicts Valentin Serov and Elena Tyapkina in Alexander Stolper’s "Wait for Me" (1943), with screenplay by Konstantin Simonov.

Press photo

Wartime Soviet cinema, with its ability to raise the nation’s patriotic spirit, acquired strategic importance. When the Germans were approaching Moscow, all film studios were evacuated to Alma-Ata, where work continued “in the field.” The photo depicts Valentin Serov and Elena Tyapkina in Alexander Stolper’s "Wait for Me" (1943), with screenplay by Konstantin Simonov.
Perhaps the most difficult period for Soviet cinema was the first half of the 1950s. One after another the party churned out regulations governing all types of art. Only after Stalin's death in 1953 did film witness a revival. There were even some international triumphs. For example, Mikhail Kalatozov’s “The Cranes Are Flying” was awarded the Cannes prize.

Press photo

Perhaps the most difficult period for Soviet cinema was the first half of the 1950s. One after another the party churned out regulations governing all types of art. Only after Stalin's death in 1953 did film witness a revival. There were even some international triumphs. For example, Mikhail Kalatozov’s “The Cranes Are Flying” was awarded the Cannes prize.
The 1960s were a watershed decade not only for Soviet cinema, but for the country as a whole: a time of new aspirations. Polytechnic students listened to rebellious young poets, a whole cohort of new names appeared in the world of cinema, and Mosfilm produced at least ten first-class pictures every year. Among them, the first works of Andrei Tarkovsky (here: “Ivan's Childhood”).

Press photo

The 1960s were a watershed decade not only for Soviet cinema, but for the country as a whole: a time of new aspirations. Polytechnic students listened to rebellious young poets, a whole cohort of new names appeared in the world of cinema, and Mosfilm produced at least ten first-class pictures every year. Among them, the first works of Andrei Tarkovsky (here: “Ivan's Childhood”).
In the 1970s, Mosfilm became Europe's largest studio. By then, the studio had released around 1200 movies and received 166 awards at international festivals. Down on the production floor, the studio could do whatever it pleased: build a medieval castle or spaceship, mint vintage coins, or sew camisoles after the fashion of Napoleon's army.

Press photo

In the 1970s, Mosfilm became Europe's largest studio. By then, the studio had released around 1200 movies and received 166 awards at international festivals. Down on the production floor, the studio could do whatever it pleased: build a medieval castle or spaceship, mint vintage coins, or sew camisoles after the fashion of Napoleon's army.
The 1980s saw virtually no new names on the domestic movie scene — the roles went mostly to old hands. No one could foresee the ultimate demise of the Soviet Union, yet there were some ripples on the surface. Vladimir Naumov and Alain Delon on the set of “Tehran- 43” (1980)

Press photo

The 1980s saw virtually no new names on the domestic movie scene — the roles went mostly to old hands. No one could foresee the ultimate demise of the Soviet Union, yet there were some ripples on the surface. Vladimir Naumov and Alain Delon on the set of “Tehran- 43” (1980)
When it came, not only the structure of the Soviet film industry collapsed, but the system of distribution too, and domestic cinema found itself in fierce competition with the U.S. Most features with the nation’s favorite artists (who until recently had people standing in line at the box office) were not widely released. Elena Korikova in an adaptation of Pushkin's "The Squire's Daughter" (1995).

Press photo

When it came, not only the structure of the Soviet film industry collapsed, but the system of distribution too, and domestic cinema found itself in fierce competition with the U.S. Most features with the nation’s favorite artists (who until recently had people standing in line at the box office) were not widely released. Elena Korikova in an adaptation of Pushkin's "The Squire's Daughter" (1995).
By the beginning of the 21st century, Mosfilm had managed to establish a viable economic model and recoup its investments in modernization. But it was a different Mosfilm. Today, it makes serials and fancy shows for Channel One. But children's film has gone, so too have musicals and classics. Its directors are now scattered across various smaller studios. Mosfilm head Karen Shakhnazarov on the set of "White Tiger" (2012)

Press photo

By the beginning of the 21st century, Mosfilm had managed to establish a viable economic model and recoup its investments in modernization. But it was a different Mosfilm. Today, it makes serials and fancy shows for Channel One. But children's film has gone, so too have musicals and classics. Its directors are now scattered across various smaller studios. Mosfilm head Karen Shakhnazarov on the set of "White Tiger" (2012)
January 30, 2014
Tags: cinema, movies

Read more

 Back to top