Household waste is the biggest environmental danger in the eyes of 58 percent of Russians.

Half of the respondents polled by the Russian Public Opinion Study Center (VTsIOM) put the blame on transportation vehicles and 49 percent criticized industrial waste.

Litter and household waste equally bother people in Moscow, St. Petersburg and other cities with a population exceeding one million and in the countryside (60 percent). People older than 45 tend to be more concerned about household waste. Yet the respondents aged from 35 to 44 and the younger generation aged from 18 to 24 are not indifferent to waste dumps either.

In the opinion of 78 percent of Russians, the liquidation of waste dumps and proper waste management should become a priority of Russia's environmental policy. Fifty-six percent spoke about the reduction of industrial emissions and the restoration of forests.

As to their personal contribution to the fight against litter and waste dumps, 88 percent are ready not to litter in the street, 74 percent pledge to be economical with tap water and to observe fire safety rules in forests, 74 percent are committed to the separate collection of waste, 70 percent want to plant trees, and 64 percent to ration electricity wisely.

More than 92 percent of Russians said they were ready to bring old household appliances at special waste collection stations, 90 percent were ready to separate collected waste, 81 percent to exchange used plastic bottles for small compensation at shops, 76 percent to bring waste paper for recycling and 75 percent to bring spent batteries to special waste collection stations.

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